The negative effects of gluteal mass loss

January 18, 2017

Most lower back pain will be related to tightness in the waist and hips region, disc degeneration, or some compensatory movements dysfunctioning.

Most lower back pain will be related to tightness in the waist and hips region, disc degeneration, or some compensatory-movements dysfunctioning.

Most of these abnormalities can be identified using movement screening and diagnostic imaging; however, in the majority of low-back pain cases, there’s a lack of skeleton alignment due to a lack of gluteal inner mass-loss, and most notably, a visible lack of gluteal development in the individuals.

The gluteus maximus is important in many of our daily activities including walking, running, lifting and bending forward, and it plays an important role in pelvis stability.
Gluteal muscles are only partially responsible for giving the buttocks their characteristic shape. The subcutaneous layers of fat (panniculus adiposus) contributes to the “roundness” of the buttocks.

It has been shown that injuries or pains also contribute to gluteal dysfunctioning or atrophy; as muscles diminish, so does our bone structure. In a recent scientific study, patients who had suffered ankle sprains were shown to have a reduced activation level of the gluteus maximus.

Most individuals who don’t receive proper rehabilitation for such injuries (like ankle sprains) develop scar tissue and immobilization of the ankle joint that further exacerbates atrophy of the glutes.

These findings confirm that changes in the muscles firing patterns, (particularly by the gluteus maximus) can lead to muscle inhibition and/or atrophy. Bone structure, along wish muscles to support such a heavy structure is likely to become porous, and fortunately, we’re taking deeper looks at cases like this these days.

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